Summer Games

June TBA, 2018
Indiana State University and Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, Terre Haute

Swimming is one of the most popular sports in the world. Unlike other sports, swimming is a life skill that is taught, first, to ensure safety and, secondly, for sports and competition purposes. Aquatics covers a great variety of swimming skills, from short sprints to longer events and relays. Athletes can enter a maximum of three events. Each event will have a preliminary and a final so each swimmer will have six events to swim.

Swimmers must participate in a preliminary of an event to be eligible for the final in that event. Swimmers can only enter into Aquatic events during Summer Games.

The Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Aquatics shall govern all Special Olympics competitions. Special Olympics has created these rules based upon Federation International de Natacion Amateur (FINA) rules, which shall be employed except when they are in conflict with the Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Aquatics or Article 1. In such cases, the Official Special Olympics Rules for Aquatics shall apply.

Bocce, like many other sports, has evolved over a long period of time. Bocce, best known in Italy, is one of the oldest of all lawn bowling games. Bocce is played with eight large balls, and one small target ball called the “Jack”. Players seek to place their balls nearer to the “Jack” than their opponent, or attempt to displace their opponent’s ball. Thereby, improving the position of their own ball in relation to the “Jack”. Bocce as a Special Olympics sport provides people with special needs the opportunity to have social contact, develop physically and to gain self-confidence.

Athletes and Unified Sports Partners must be 30 years of age to compete in Bocce. The Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Bocce govern all Special Olympics competitions. Special Olympics has created these rules based on the International Bocce Association rules, which shall be employed except when they are in conflict with the Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Bocce.

Ten-pin Bowling commonly called “Bowling” in the US, is a competitive sport in which a player (the “bowler”) rolles a bowling ball down a wooden or synthetic lane with the objectvie of scoring points by knocking down as many pins as possible.

Although Bowling does not belong to the Olympic sports, it is among the most popular sports in Special Olympics. It is a particularly beneficial sport to people with intellectual disabilities, irrespective of their age or sports abilities, since it ensures physical exercise and at the same time participation and social integration. Plus, it’s great fun!

At Summer Games, the program participates in Traditional Doubles. Assisted Ramp and Individual are offered in the fall.

The Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Bowling govern all Special Olympics competition. Special Olympics has created these rules based upon World Tenpin Bowling Association (WTBA) rules, which shall be employed except when they are in conflict with the Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Bowling.

Every athlete aims in lifting more weights than the opponent using specific moves. In Special Olympics Powerlifting is much more than deadlift, squat or bench press. It is effort, persistence and loyalty. Training, determination and attitude, are the key facts that define the balance between a successful or a failed attempt. The barbell, despite testing the physical strength, is also highlighting the athlete’s inner wish to improve, “not to make compromises.”

The traditional events offered at Summer Games are the bench press, deadlift, squat, and combination (bench press, deadlift, and squat).

The International Powerlifting Federation, which is the international governing body for the sport of powerlifting, has been supporting Special Olympics lifters for years. In April 2013, the IPF and Special Olympics agreed to work together to grow the sport worldwide for people with intellectual disabilities. For example, Special Olympics athletes competed during the 2013 Women’s and Men’s World Masters Powerlifting Championships in Orlando, Florida, USA. The IPF has agreed to share its expertise in Special Olympics powerlifting skills workshops.

The Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Powerlifting govern all Special Olympics competitions. Special Olympics has created these rules based upon International Powerlifting Federation (IPF) rules, which shall be employed except when they are in conflict with the Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Powerlifting.

The sport of athletics encourages athletes of all abilities and ages to compete at their optimum level. Through the track-and-field-based athletics training program, participants can develop total fitness to compete in any sport. As with all Special Olympics sports, athletics offers athletes the opportunity to learn through skill development and competitive settings and to be involved in large social settings.

Track and field is a sport comprising of various competitive athletic contests based on running, jumping, and throwing. The name of the sport derives from the competition venue: a stadium with an oval running track around a grass field. The throwing and jumping events generally take place in the central enclosed area.

Participants are entered into one of the following levels – Level M (Motor Development), Level 1A (Assisted Walkers), Level 1B (Unassisted Walkers), Level 1C (Motorized Wheelchairs), Level 1D (Manual Wheelchairs), Level 2 (Sprinters & Walkers), Level 3A (Sprinters), Level 3B (Distance Runners), or Unified Team Competition, based primarily on the athlete’s ability. The level system provides coaches with an effective guide for assessing athlete’s abilities and placing them in the most appropriate events. Athletes and Unified Sports Partners may enter up to three events including relays. No more than two of the events may be field events.

In an effort to improve divisioning, select events have a preliminary round of competition. Athletes will then be re-devisioned into final rounds of competition.

The Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Track & Field shall govern Special Olympics competitions. Special Olympics has created these rules based upon USA Track & Field rules, which shall be employed except when they are in conflict with the Official Special Olympics Sports Rules or Article 1. In such cases, the Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Track & Field shall apply.

The game of volleyball is attractive to all types of players, from competitive to recreational, young and old. To play volleyball players need to acquire a few basic skills, learn a few rules, require very little equipment, and can play the game almost anywhere – from the beach to the gym. The aim of the sport is to score more points by hitting the ball with the hands and sending it over the net to the opponent’s court.

The Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Volleyball shall govern Special Olympics competitions. Special Olympics has created these rules based upon United States Volleyball Association (USVBA) rules, which shall be employed except when they are in conflict with the Official Special Olympics Sports Rules or Article 1. In such cases, the Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Volleyball shall apply.

eks+ Games

September 10, 2017
Corn Toss, Long Distance Run/Walk, Flag Football, and Unified Volleyball at Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School, Indianapolis

September 15-16, 2017
Equestrian Championships at Hendricks County 4-H Fairgrounds and Conference Complex, Danville

September 23, 2017
Softball State Tournaments at Midwest Sports Complex, Indianapolis

Corn Toss, also known as bean bag toss, corn hole, baggo or bags, is a lawn game in which players take turns throwing corn hole bags at a raised platform with a hole in the far end. A corn bag in the hole scores 3 points, while one on the platform scores 1 point. Play continues until a team or player reaches the score of 21. Corn toss competition is offered during the Eunice Kennedy Shriver (EKS) Games held at the Brebuef Jesuit Preparatory School in Indianapolis in the month of September.

The Official Special Olympics Sports Rules govern all Special Olympics competition. Special Olympics has created these rules based upon the American Cornhole Association (ACA) rules, which shall be employed except when they are in conflict with the Official Special Olympics Sport Rules for corntoss.

Equestrian is one of the most fascinating sports during the Eunice Kennedy Shriver Games. The balance, the stability and the right communication between the horse and the rider is a key element for success in Equestrian sport.

Athletes may participate up to two mounted and two unmounted events. Events are divided into three levels so that athletes of all abilities may participate. Modified events include: grooming and tracking, horse parts identification and spoon race. The traditional events include: barrel race, dressage, drill team (2 and 4 person) driving, English Equitation, English Trail, Prix Caprilli, showmanship, stake race, team relay, Western Trail and Western Equitation. Unified Sports events include: team relay, 2 and 4 person drill teams.

The Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Equestrian shall govern all Special Olympics competitions. Special Olympics has created these rules based upon Federation Equestre Internationale (FEI) rules, which shall be employed except when they are in conflict with the Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Softball or Article 1. In such cases, the Official Special Olympics Rules for Softball shall apply.

Flag Football is a version of American football or Canadian football where the basic rules of the game are similar to those of the mainstream game (often called “tackle football” for contrast), but instead of tackling players to the ground, the defensive team must remove a flag or flag belt from the ball carrier (“deflagging”) to end a down.

The Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Flag Football shall govern all Special Olympics competitions. Special Olympics has created these rules based upon National Football League’s Air It Out Flag Football rules, which shall be employed except when they are in conflict with the Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Flag Football. In such cases, the Official Special Olympics Rules for Flag Football shall apply.

Long distance running or walking is a form of continuous running or walking over distances of at least five kilometres (3.1 miles). Physiologically, it is largely aerobic in nature and requires stamina. Among mamals, humans are well adapted for running significant distances, and particularly so among primates.

The Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Track & Field shall govern Special Olympics competitions. Special Olympics has created these rules based upon USA Track & Field rules, which shall be employed except when they are in conflict with the Official Special Olympics Sports Rules or Article 1. In such cases, the Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Track & Field shall apply.

Softball is a bat-and-ball sport played between two teams of 10 to 14 players. Every team aims in scoring as many runs possible, against the opponents by striking the ball with a specific bat. It is a direct descendant of baseball although there are some key differences: softballs are larger than baseballs, and the pitches are thrown underhand rather than overhand. The game is played on a smaller diamond than in baseball and despite the game’s name, the standard softball is not soft; in fact, it is harder than a baseball.

Softball is a variant of baseball played with a larger ball on a smaller field. Invented (1888) in Chicago as an indoor game, it was at various times called indoor baseball, mush ball, playground ball, kitten ball, and, because it was also played by women, ladies’ baseball. The name softball was given to the game in 1926. Softball competition is offered during the weekend of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver (EKS) Games held at the Midwest Sports Complex in Indianapolis in the month of September.

The Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Softball shall govern all Special Olympics competitions. Special Olympics has created these rules based upon International Softball Federation (ISF) rules, which shall be employed except when they are in conflict with the Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Softball or Article 1. In such cases, the Official Special Olympics Rules for Softball shall apply.

The game of volleyball is attractive to all types of players, from competitive to recreational, young and old. To play volleyball players need to acquire a few basic skills, learn a few rules, require very little equipment, and can play the game almost anywhere – from the beach to the gym. The aim of the sport is to score more points by hitting the ball with the hands and sending it over the net to the opponent’s court.

The roster of the Unified Volleyball team shall contain a proportionate number of athletes and Unified Sports Partners. During competition, the line-up shall have three athletes and three Unified Sports Partners at any time. Penalty results in a forfeit. The service order shall be an alteration of athletes and Unified Partners.

The Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Volleyball shall govern Special Olympics competitions. Special Olympics has created these rules based upon United States Volleyball Association (USVBA) rules, which shall be employed except when they are in conflict with the Official Special Olympics Sports Rules or Article 1. In such cases, the Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Volleyball shall apply.

Individual Bowling and Assisted Ramp Competitions

TBD, 2017
Local Bowling Tournament at Pollard’s Bowl, Versailles

TBD, 2017
Local Bowling Tournament at Durbin Bowl, Lawrenceburg

November 11, 2017
Area 9 Bowling Tournament at Woodland Bowl, Indianapolis

December 2, 2017
State Bowling Tournament

December 3, 2017
State Unified Bowling Tournament

Ten-pin Bowling commonly called “Bowling” in the US, is a competitive sport in which a player (the “bowler”) rolles a bowling ball down a wooden or synthetic lane with the objectvie of scoring points by knocking down as many pins as possible.

Although Bowling does not belong to the Olympic sports, it is among the most popular sports in Special Olympics. It is a particularly beneficial sport to people with intellectual disabilities, irrespective of their age or sports abilities, since it ensures physical exercise and at the same time participation and social integration. Plus, it’s great fun!

During this bowling season, athletes may participate in Traditional Individual Competition or Ramp Competition. Bowlers must participate in a local tournament (October) to qualify to advance on to the area tournament held in early November. Depending on the number of participants registered for the area tournament, the local tournament could be an eliminator. The state tournament is held in Indianapolis in early December. Bowlers must receive a first place ribbon in their division at the area tournament to advance on to the state tournament

The Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Bowling govern all Special Olympics competition. Special Olympics has created these rules based upon World Tenpin Bowling Association (WTBA) rules, which shall be employed except when they are in conflict with the Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Bowling.

Winter Games

January 7 – 9, 2018
Perfect North Slopes, Lawrenceburg
Higher Grounds Conference and Retreat Center, West Harrison

Alpine skiing is the sport of sliding down snow-covered hills on skis with fixed-heel bindings. It is also commonly known as downhill skiing. Alpine skiing is one of a few sports that does not require the standard eight week training preceding competition. No qualification score is necessary prior to entry. Athletes will have the opportunity to compete in preliminaries. Athletes may participate in one sport only (Alping Skiing, Snowboarding, or Snowshoeing) and may be entered into two events within a category (Novice, Intermediate, Advanced) in that sport.

The Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Aquatics shall govern all Special Olympics competitions. Special Olympics has created these rules based upon Federation International de Natacion Amateur (FINA) rules, which shall be employed except when they are in conflict with the Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Aquatics or Article 1. In such cases, the Official Special Olympics Rules for Aquatics shall apply.

Snowboarding is a recreational activity that involves descending a slope that is covered with snow while standing on a snowboard attached to a rider’s feet. The snowboard is attached using a special boot set into a mounted binding.

The development of snowboarding was inspired by skateboarding, sledding, surfing and skiing. It was developed in the United States in the 1960s and became a Winter Olympics sport  in 1998.

Snowsboarding is one of a few sports that does not require the standard eight week training preceding competition.No qualification score is necessary prior to entry. Athletes will have the opportunity to compete in preliminaries. Athletes may participate in one sport only (Alping Skiing, Snowboarding, or Snowshoeing) and may be entered into two events within a category (Novice, Intermediate, Advanced) in that sport.

The Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Winter Games shall govern all Special Olympics competitions. Special Olympics has created these rules based upon International Sports Federation (ISF) rules (Alpine Skiing – Federation International de Ski (FIS); Snowshoeing – Special Olympics, Inc.;  which shall be employed except when they are in conflict with the Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Winter Games. In such cases, the Official Special Olympics Rules for Winter Games shall apply.

Snowshoeing is the sport of competitive athletic contests based on running while wearing snowshoes. A snowshoe is footwear for walking over the snow. Snowshoes work by distributing the weight of the person over a larger area so that the person’s foot does not sink completely into the snow, a quality called “flotation”. Snowshoeing is one of a few sports that does not require the standard eight week training preceding competition. No qualification score is necessary prior to entry. Athletes will have the opportunity to compete in preliminaries. Athletes may participate in one sport only (Alping Skiing, Snowboarding, or Snowshoeing) and may be entered into two events within a category (Novice, Intermediate, Advanced) in that sport.

The Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Winter Games shall govern all Special Olympics competitions. Special Olympics has created these rules based upon International Sports Federation (ISF) rules (Alpine Skiing – Federation International de Ski (FIS); Snowshoeing – Special Olympics, Inc.;  which shall be employed except when they are in conflict with the Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Winter Games. In such cases, the Official Special Olympics Rules for Winter Games shall apply.

Basketball

March 10 – 11, 2018
Women’s Basketball State Tournament at DePauw University, Greencastle

March 17, 2018
Men’s Basketball Sectionals at Triton Central High School, Fairland

March 24, 2018
Youth Basketball State Tournament at University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis

March 24 – 25, 2018
Men’s Basketball State Tournament at Indiana State University, Terre Haute

Basketball is one of the top sports at Special Olympics. Players take it up at all ages and at all abilities, from young players learning to handle the ball and keep it under control while dribbling to older, more experienced players who have the moves and know the strategies to play challenging ball.

It’s also one of the favorite sports for the Special Olympics Unified Sports initiative, when players with and without intellectual disabilities form teams to play other unified teams. It’s a learning experience that’s also a lot of fun.

Basketball individual skills is offered to those athletes who do not posses basketball skills, focusing on building the skills of target passing, dribbling, and spot shooting. 3 on 3 basketball competition can be a means to assist athletes with lower ability levels to progress to full court play.

Basketball is one of the top sports at Special Olympics. Players take it up at all ages and at all abilities, from young players learning to handle the ball and keep it under control while dribbling to older, more experienced players who have the moves and know the strategies to play challenging ball.

It’s also one of the favorite sports for the Special Olympics Unified Sports initiative, when players with and without intellectual disabilities form teams to play other unified teams. It’s a learning experience that’s also a lot of fun.

Basketball is a team sport, the objective being to shoot a ball through a horizontally positioned basket to score points, while following a set of rules. Usually, two teams of five players play on a marked rectangular court with a basket at each width end. 3 on 3 basketball is offered to athletes who do not possess the skills or stamina to participate in full-court 5-on-5 basketball. Skill levels include Level 4 (below average), Level 3 (average), Level 2 (above average) and Level 1 (high school level).

The Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Basketball shall govern all Special Olympics competitions. Special Olympics has created these rules based upon National Federation of State High School Association (NFHS) rules, which shall be employed when they are in conflict with the Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Basketball.

Basketball is one of the top sports at Special Olympics. Players take it up at all ages and at all abilities, from young players learning to handle the ball and keep it under control while dribbling to older, more experienced players who have the moves and know the strategies to play challenging ball.

It’s also one of the favorite sports for the Special Olympics Unified Sports initiative, when players with and without intellectual disabilities form teams to play other unified teams. It’s a learning experience that’s also a lot of fun.

Basketball is a team sport, the objective being to shoot a ball through a horizontally positioned basket to score points, while following a set of rules. Usually, two teams of five players play on a marked rectangular court with a basket at each width end. 3 on 3 basketball is offered to athletes who do not possess the skills or stamina to participate in full-court 5-on-5 basketball. Skill levels include Level 4 (below average), Level 3 (average), Level 2 (above average) and Level 1 (high school level).

The Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Basketball shall govern all Special Olympics competitions. Special Olympics has created these rules based upon National Federation of State High School Association (NFHS) rules, which shall be employed when they are in conflict with the Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Basketball.

Basketball is one of the top sports at Special Olympics. Players take it up at all ages and at all abilities, from young players learning to handle the ball and keep it under control while dribbling to older, more experienced players who have the moves and know the strategies to play challenging ball.

There are two age groups within youth 5-on-5 full-court basketball – Junior (15 & under) and Senior (16 to 21). The age group of a team is determined by the oldest player. Skill levels include Level 4 (below average), Level 3 (average), Level 2 (above average) and Level 1 (high school level).

The Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Basketball shall govern all Special Olympics competitions. Special Olympics has created these rules based upon National Federation of State High School Association (NFHS) rules, which shall be employed when they are in conflict with the Official Special Olympics Sports Rules for Basketball.ion can be a means to assist athletes with lower ability levels to progress to full court play.